Hedy Lamarr Early 1940s WING


 

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Hedy Lamarr Early 1940s

A legend in her lifetime, the name Hedy Lamarr conjures up images of a very beautiful woman who also had a brilliant mind. The posters, lobby cards and stills of Hedy speak for themselves. They tell of a time when she reigned as one of the world’s most beautiful women.

With her friend, composer George Antheil, she invented a radio guidance system that is used in today’s technology. Both she and Antheil were inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.

Hedy’s career began in Germany where she made the controversial film Ecstasy in 1933. She then married a wealthy and older German industrialist and military arms manufacturer. During her time with him she learned about science, as her husband would take her to business meetings. He would meet with scientists and other military experts and Hedy was not only beautiful, but intelligent.

World War II was looming and Hedy, who was Jewish, knew she had to escape both her country and her husband, who was selling arms to Mussolini. She went to Paris and, as fate would have it, Louis B. Mayer, head of MGM, was in Europe looking for talent. Louis was enthralled with Hedy’s beauty and he offered her a film contract. He hoped she would have the same star power as Greta Garbo.

American audiences were told that a new Austrian actress would be appearing in an MGM film. When audiences first saw Hedy, they gasped. She was that beautiful.

She made many successful films with the leading actors of that time, like Clark Gable and Spencer Tracey. Her performance in White Cargo was unforgettable. In Samson and Delilah she was a perfect Delilah to Victor Mature’s character of Samson.

It is obvious from these photos, posters, lobby cards and stills that Hedy was incredibly beautiful. It is also obvious that she was incredibly intelligent. But sometimes, being at the peak is a very dangerous thing. You could fall.